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    MapleTreeNatural Control is a system of controlling plant pests and diseases without the use of chemicals, by employing predators and parasites that feed upon them. Like all pests, the Cottony Maple Scale has natural predators that includes lady beetles, predatory mites as well as parasitic wasps that feed on the scale.  Lady beetle adults and larvae are visible but the mites and parasitic wasps are very difficult to see.

    There are over 5,000 different lady beetle varieties in the continental U.S. many of which are well established in prairie regions. Ladybugs are actually beetles in the Coleoptera family Coccinellidae and as insects go, they are a very beneficial group, being natural enemies of many agricultural pests, especially aphids, plant scale and other critters that damage plants by feeding on their sap.  A single lady beetle can consume over 5,000 aphids over its entire life span.

    TwiceStabbedLadyBeetleOne notable ladybug, the twice stabbed lady beetle has a natural predator-prey relationship with the Cottony Maple Scale.  The adult is 1/8 in. in diameter and black with 2 red spots on its back.  It overwinters under loose bark and in the spring feeds on overwintered scale.  This beneficial lady bug lays eggs at the same time cottony maple scale egg masses are being produced. Their population increases in direct relation to the increase in the scale population. This lady beetle will work in earnest to reduce the cottony maple scale to very low numbers during the 3-year cycle.

    The application of commercial lady beetles to reduce cottony maple scale is unproven.  Many imported lady bug species sold commercially are non-native species which when introduced have a shortened life span and difficulty overwintering because of the non-native climate.  In the final analysis, local native species have the best track record of bringing cottony maple scale populations under control.

    Homeowners can do a number of things to help support the presence of lady beetles on their property. Refraining from using chemical insecticides for pest control is essential.  In addition, homeowners can introduce the following flowers known to attract lady beetles into their garden — chives, marigolds, cosmos, feverfew, sea lavender, mustard and calendula.

    Tree Care is Essential in Battling a Scale Infestation: Host trees most susceptible to an infestation are stressed from poor tree care.  A good tree care regimen should include pruning infested branches, adequate watering during drought, establishing a mulched zone under the canopy and avoiding trunk injuries to strengthen the tree’s ability to weather an infestation.

    SootyMoldCleaning Up ‘Sooty Mold’ - If honeydew excretion is left to accumulate, it can turn into ‘sooty mold’, a dark-colored fungi that if not removed can cause health problems for those with a  respiratory condition or those susceptible to airborne allergens.  The best method for removing ‘sooty mold’ colonies is a concentration of warm water and vinegar using a sponge or scrub brush and hose rinse. A recommended clean up solution to kill established mold colonies is:

    • 1/3 Cup Powered Household Detergent
    • 2/3 Cup Trisodium Phosphate (TSP)
    • 1 qt. Household Bleach
    • 3 qt. Water

    The solution should be applied on painted surfaces with a damp sponge/cloth or on concrete/asphalt surfaces with a scrub brush .

    All Natural/Non-Toxic Insecticidal Spray Solution Recipe-  Homeowners who choose to combat scale on their trees and landscaping can do so by mixing 5 Tablespoons of liquid dishwashing detergent in 1-gallon of tap water and apply using a hose-end garden sprayer.

    Recommended On-Line Educational Resources:

    CottonCotton1Cotton2


    ADA Coordinator: Robert Mellor, Assistant Village Manager
    Gregory J. Bielawski Municipal Center
    500 N. Gary Avenue
    Carol Stream, Illinois 60188
    (630) 871-6250 - Voice
    (800) 526-0844 - TDD Relay Service
    (800) 526-0857 - TDD Voice Relay Service
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

     

    Click here to review the ADA Grievance Procedure

    1. Can the Village install a stop sign to slow down the traffic on my street?
    2. What can be done to fix the ponding in my yard?
    3. Where is a specific utility located?
    4. How long is it going to take to get my permit?
    5. Why do we have to put up a preservation bond and how long does it take to get it back?
    6. Why isn't my street light working?
    7. When will my final survey be approved so that I can get my accessory permit?
    8. Can I fill my newly installed pool?
    9. What are parking lot requirements?
    10. What can be done about icing on my street or sidewalk?
    11. Is my neighbor's sump pump in conformance with the code?
    12. What are the driveway specifications?
    13. Can we obtain a conditional occupancy without all the improvements being completed, i.e. driveways, parking lots, lighting, landscaping, striping, final as-built, etc?
    14. How do I get my preservation bond back?
    15. When is my street going to be reconstructed, paved, etc.?
    16. Will my sidewalk and curb be replaced when my street is repaved?
    17. How can I sign up for the shoreline Clean-up Program?
    18. What can we do with the wetlands on our property?
    19. What are your storm water regulations?
    1. Can the Village install a stop sign to slow down the traffic on my street?

      Stop signs are not allowed to be posted to "slow down" traffic according to the Illinois Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices.  We can send "The Truth about Speeding in Residential Areas" brochure.   Top of Page
    2. What can be done to fix the ponding in my yard?

      We can take your name and address and send an inspector to your property to make suggestions.  Typically we will fill out a Citizen Service Request (CSR). Top of Page
    3. Where is a specific utility located?

      If it is an accepted subdivision call JULIE (Joint Utility Locating Information for Excavators) at 1-800-892-0123, the Village is a part of that system.  If it is an unaccepted subdivision (under construction) you need to call your builder or developer.    Top of Page
    4. How long is it going to take to get my permit?

      The Engineering Department does not issue building or accessory permits. Community Development issues all building and accessory permits. Subdivision, stormwater, utility, overweight/oversize and earth movement permits are all issued by the Engineering Services Department. Permits are reviewed based on a maximum target review time depending on the complexity of the permit.    Top of Page
    5. Why do we have to put up a preservation bond and how long does it take to get it back?

      A preservation bond is to ensure that no public facilities (roads, sidewalks, etc.) are damaged when work is done on private property.  Assuming no damage is done it can be returned in seven to ten working days after the site has been inspected.    Top of Page
    6. Why isn't my street light working?

      If it is an accepted subdivision, (village maintained) Public Works needs to be contacted to make the necessary repairs, if it is an unaccepted (develop maintained) subdivision, the developer needs to be contacted.    Top of Page
    7. When will my final survey be approved so that I can get my accessory permit?

      Final surveys are not approved in the winter because the lot needs to be inspected for drainage.  However, few accessory permits are requested in the winter.  Their approval depends on how quickly the developer performs punchlist items such as grading corrections, setting property corner irons, installing sod, etc.    Top of Page
    8. Can I fill my newly installed pool?

      Pools can be filled according to the odd/even date and address relationship.  For instance if you live at 111 Hillcrest, you can only fill on odd numbered calendar days.  If you would like to fill your pool for two (2) consecutive days you must be placed on the watering list.  The Engineering Department requires your name and address to be placed on the "watering list".    Top of Page
    9. What are parking lot requirements?

      Parking lot stall size and number are regulated by the Community Development Department.  Physical construction, i.e., material and thickness, is regulated by Engineering depending on the zoning and use.    Top of Page
    10. What can be done about icing on my street or sidewalk?

      Icing in the street should be reported to Public Works so they can salt the location, however the homeowner is responsible for icing on the sidewalk.  We can generate a CSR to determine if anything can be done depending on the individual circumstances creating the icing problem.    Top of Page
    11. Is my neighbor's sump pump in conformance with the code?

       The Village does not have a code requirement for the minimum distance that a sump pump discharge must be placed from a property line. Our Code prohibits sump pump discharges from causing damage, as defined in Section 14-1-1, and would thus be enforced under Section 14-1-4. The Village relies instead on Illinois Drainage Law, which allows for drainage from upstream properties to downstream properties via the natural course of drainage or, when in a developed state, where the drainage path was designed. In residential areas built after 1970, the designed drainage path is typically in side and rear yard swales out towards the street or towards a storm drain. Neighbors are encouraged to work together on a solution that is amenable to both parties. The Engineering Department is available to provide technical guidance in the form of a site visit or a letter informing the owner of the sump pump of their options.    Top of Page
    12. What are the driveway specifications?

      Driveway specifications depend on the type of use (commercial, industrial, residential) and zoning requirements for allowable width depending on the width of the lot.  Construction materials and thickness is also dependent on the use.    Top of Page
    13. Can we obtain a conditional occupancy without all the improvements being completed, i.e. driveways, parking lots, lighting, landscaping, striping, final as-built, etc?

      Conditional occupancy can be obtained by posting securities for the uncompleted items.  These items are usually cosmetic, and can not affect the safety or operation of the facility and the work that could not be completed in time was beyond the control of the builder or developer.    Top of Page
    14. How do I get my preservation bond back?

      Bonds can only be returned after the item in question has been completed, inspected and improved.  Call the Engineering Department at (630)871-6220 to ask for a final inspection.    Top of Page
    15. When is my street going to be reconstructed, paved, etc.?

      We can check the Capital Improvements Program for the next year.  If it is not on the list we can re-evaluate it when the streets are inspected in the summer.    Top of Page
    16. Will my sidewalk and curb be replaced when my street is repaved?

      Depending on the condition of the concrete the inspector will determine what needs to be replaced.    Top of Page
    17. How can I sign up for the shoreline Clean-up Program?

      We can send you a registration packet if you could tell us your name, address and number of volunteers.    Top of Page
    18. What can we do with the wetlands on our property?

      Certain wetlands are protected by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and all wetlands in DuPage County are protected by the DuPage County Countywide Stormwater & Flood Plain Ordinance (hereafter referred to as the “Ordinance”).  Any activity that effects a wetland or its 50-foot buffer including changes in hydrology is a difficult process to get permitted.  Our suggestion is to hire a reputable consultant that has a lot of experience with the DuPage County (DPC) Ordinance.    Top of Page
    19. What are your storm water regulations?

      The Village of Carol Stream has adopted the DPC Ordinance and is a full-waiver community.  This means the Village not the County performs the reviews and issues the permit.  A copy of the Ordinance can be obtained from DuPage County.  Any non-Special Management Area (SMA) questions, can be answered by Village Engineering Staff whereas SMA (includes floodway, floodplain, wetlands and fringe areas) questions can be addressed by our engineering consultant, Christopher B. Burke.    Top of Page
    The Village of Carol Stream airs Board meetings and other community relevant programming on Comcast and AT&T U-Verse.  Though the programming schedule does change, there are some constants.

    Sunday - Village Programming (Round Tables, Parades, Concerts..etc)

    Monday - Board Meetings / Illinois Government (Board Meetings are aired at 12:00, 4:00, 6:00, 10:00)

    Tuesday - Police and Senior programming (Information on Senior programs or Police programs in the community)

    Wednesday - Board Meetings / Illinois Government (Board Meetings are aired at 12:00, 4:00, 6:00, 10:00)

    Thursday - Village Programming (Round Tables, Parades, Concerts..etc)

    Friday - Board Meetings / Illinois Government (Board Meetings are aired at 12:00, 4:00, 6:00, 10:00)

    Saturday - School District programming

    The Village will automatically establish a new resident’s water account upon their new home’s transfer of ownership.  Water consumption is metered and billed monthly while sewer service is billed monthly based on monthly water use.  An average residential household consumes approximately 7,000 gallons of water each month.  The Village offers several means by which a resident can pay their monthly water/sewer bill.  The Village offers an electronic funds transfer payment option (ACH) called Stream-line Pay and an Internet payment option called e-Stream, both accessed via the Village’s website www. carolstream.org.  Residents may also pay their bill in person, deposit their payment in the night depository box located in the Village Hall west parking lot or mail their payment by utilizing the self-address return envelop that is included in the water bill.  Payments received after the 20th of the month are assessed a 10% late fee that is applied to the next bill.

    To obtain the "Stream" -Line Pay form required to authorize automatic payment of your water bill by your bank click on the following link Stream Line Pay

    500 North Gary Avenue | Carol Stream, Illinois 60188 | Phone: (630) 665-7050 | TDD: (630) 668-5785 | Fax: (630) 665-1064
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